The institution of healthcare is integral for the health and care of human beings, but if we have a system that is not safe, why would anyone seek care?

Reply to Megan: While all of the latter issues continue to occur as problems with the U.S. healthcare system the most challenging is quality of healthcare. The institution of healthcare is integral for the health and care of human beings, but if we have a system that is not safe, why would anyone seek care? To think about this problem in different terms; we have a numerous amount of auto repair shops to choose from when seeking services for our vehicles, however we would not go to an establishment that would not fix our vehicle properly. This is the same principle that can be applied with healthcare. People want to be cared for by a safe and knowledgeable provider and nursing staff that have their patient’s best interests at heart. A release of the 1999 Institute of Medicine report stated “as many as 98,000 deaths a year could be attributed to preventable medical errors. Some of the untoward events categorized in this report included adverse drug events and improper transfusions, surgical injuries and wrong-site surgery, suicides, restraint-related injuries or death, falls, burns, pressure ulcers, and mistaken client identities” (Stanhope & Lancaster, 2018). A culture of quality improvement has been introduced. Along with other measures “CMS announced in 2008 that it would no longer reimburse hospitals, under Medicare guidelines, for care provided for ‘preventable complications,’ such as hospital-acquired infections. This reimbursement policy was extended to Medicaid reimbursement in 2011” (Stanhope & Lancaster, 2018). This would serve as an incentive for physicians to provide quality of care to patients or else they would not get reimbursed for their services.

Is this part of your assignment? ORDER NOW