I need answers to those questions as instructed:

  1. In a developed paragraph, answer the following question: Religious freedom is a bedrock right in American practice. But with the increasing secularization of the country, there are growing voices that suggest religiously-based opinions are invalid and unwelcome in public policy debates. Do you see a challenge to religious freedom in the future? If so, what impact will that challenge have? If not, what is the role for religion in the public square?
  2. In a developed paragraph, answer the following question: Your friend is complaining about how “Dark Money” is destroying our democracy and that political donations should be limited or outright banned. What Supreme Court case or cases would you cite that are relevant to campaign finance? Using those cases, construct an argument supporting or opposing your friend’s position.
  3. In a developed paragraph, answer the following question: Give an example that illustrates the doctrine of the “fruit of the poisonous tree.”
  4. In a developed paragraph, answer the following question: Use examples to support or oppose the idea that the legal foundation of all modern civil rights in America stem from the struggle for racial justice.
  5. In a developed paragraph, answer the following question: Recently, the US Women’s Soccer team sued the U.S. Soccer Federation for wage discrimination. Discuss the the precedent you would cite if you were on their legal team.
  6. In a developed paragraph, answer the following question: What is the status of the legal right to abortion in America today? Refer to relevant Supreme Court cases and our class discussion in your answer.
  7. In a one page, well-crafted essay, please answer the question below. You should use this essay as an opportunity to demonstrate what you have learned from the course. That is, your answer should not be something you could have written if you never took this course. Citing court cases we have studied is encouraged.

There are two types of rights, communal and individual.  Individual rights are more familiar to us, as they are the political rights we enjoy in a free society.  Also, our culture tends to be very individualistic.  Communal rights are a new idea to many.  They are the rights that a society should enjoy, such as basic standards of living, equity and justice.  Another way of thinking of them is that a community has a right to define itself and establish a set of standards for those who live within it. A noise ordinance is an example. You have an individual right to listen to terrible music really loud, but the community curtails that right around 10 pm because your neighbors have a communal right to a good nights sleep.

One example of these rights colliding is the gay marriage debate.  Those who focus on individual rights argue that not being allowed to marry places homosexuals in a second class citizen status.  Those who focus on communal rights argue that the community has a legitimate interest in traditional families thriving because nothing else in society works when families are dysfunctional.

Another example is that every time there is a mass shooting, we see a new round of debate over gun control that fall along these same lines, the rights of an individual to purchase and carry a high power weapon versus the right of a community to peacefully assemble without such weapons being present.

Does thinking in terms of rights as a continuum between these positions help or hinder a solution to these debates?

  1. In a one page, well-crafted essay, please answer the question below. You should use this essay as an opportunity to demonstrate what you have learned from the course. That is, your answer should not be something you could have written if you never took this course. Citing court cases we have studied is encouraged.

Having studied the history of civil rights in America, agree or disagree with this statement taken from the first reading assignment: “Americans prefer liberty over authority, freedom over responsibility, rights over duties. [From the days of the founding] Americans have talked about practically nothing else but liberty. Not the good man, but the free man has been the measure of all things … not national glory, but individual liberty has been the object of political authority and the test of its worth.”

Is this part of your assignment? ORDER NOW